Choices, Perceptions and Consequences – A Story About Technology

In a recent post, +Peter DeWitt debunked many of the myths associated with the take up of technology. This included such accusations as technology is just a tool, it is stupid and the Internet cannot be trusted. What this highlighted to me is that we all have an influence over the success and failure of each element of change that may occur in education and it starts with the way we choose to respond.

 
As I have explored before, there are often so many choices that we are faced with on a day to day basis. For example, in my previous post on digital literacy, I touched on social bookmarking. There are so many options out there, whether it be Pinterest, Diigo, Delicious, Educlipper or Evernote. Clearly, each offering something that bit different, but all providing a space to share your bookmarks with others in some way or another.
 
In addition to selecting a different application, there are also different perspectives associated with how we approach various applications. Take Twitter for instance, although there is no debate that it is a micro-blogging platform, what that actually means for each person is another thing. Here are some examples of different perspectives, some positive, some negative, but all different …
 
  • Rhizomic: Unlike a tree which has a central root system, a rhizome has no centre. That means no hierarchy, no-authoritive voice. Tweets, favourites and retweets create the content, with complete control belonging with the user.

 

  • Hallway with an Endless Amount of Doors: Although there is little detail in 140 characters, each tweet often opens the door to a whole other world, a new beginning, another connection.

 

  • An Endless Party: Some people are there for themselves, while some are there for others, but in the end everyone is there for a conversation.
  • Second-Hand Goods Store: If I want to find the answer to something, why would I trawl through someone else’s opinion when I can use Google to go straight to the source.
  • Smorgasbord of Ideas: Whether it be a point of commentary, a link to some other content or an answer to a question, it is all there waiting to be picked into at your own pace.
  • Pearls of Wisdom: Although not everywhere, if you’re willing to put in the effort, go diving for them, willing to pry them loose, there are a great many pearls to be had.
  • Real Life Game: Who can get the most followers, who can get the most re-tweets, who can get something to trend. A game of intetaction for interactions sack – nothing more, nothing less.
  • Digital Billboard: Whether you’re spreading an idea or spruiking a product, everyone is flogging something. So often a follow equals follow me back just so that the user in question can spread their brand that bit further.
  • Nothing but Noise: More is less. With so many conversations going on, how can there be any clarity or cohesion?
  • Online Agora: A global place to meet, debate and exchange, minus the togas and the slaves of course?
  • Fast Flowing River: Although you will never keep a drift of everything that is going on, you can at least dip your feet in when you feel like it. So often, great ideas will pop up again and again, so if it is worth finding out, someone is always re-sharing it.
 
I am sure that there are more perspectives associated with Twitter, but you get the point. The bigger question though is what impact do you think your perspective has on the way you engage with various programs and applications? I am reminded again and again of +Seth Godin‘s assertion that attitudes can be learnt and are not a gift. So much about success comes down to how we choose to respond and associated with this, the perception we have on things.
 
So, how do you respond when you are told to use one application over another? Do you think that your mindset influences the outcome? Would love your thoughts in the comments below or on Twitter.

If you enjoy what you read here, feel free to sign up for my monthly newsletter to catch up on all things learning, edtech and storytelling.

Aaron Davis

I am an Australian educator supporting schools with the integration of technology and pedagogical innovation. I have an interest in how together we can work to make a better world.

Latest posts by Aaron Davis (see all)

Choices, Perceptions and Consequences – A Story About Technology by Aaron Davis is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

4 thoughts on “Choices, Perceptions and Consequences – A Story About Technology

  1. There’s lots I would love to unpick regarding these perspectives on Twitter Aaron, but that’s not really what you were asking, so I’ll sidestep my first inclination.

    Would I be right in thinking there are two threads to the questions you’re posing? Although the common factor is response or outcome to a stimulus, the first concerns whether perspective has an influence, and the second whether mindset does. The question then becomes whether these two threads are distinct and unrelated, or whether they’re interwoven. By that I mean that if for example you have a tendency towards a growth mindset, are you more likely to have a particular perspective when faced with a given set of circumstances?And would someone with a different mindset have a different perspective, in the same scenario? Or is it possible that two people with completely different mindsets could share the same perspective? So could two people with different mindsets both view Twitter as a fast flowing river for example?

    Perhaps then, another way to look at this would be to start at the end and look backwards? Firstly, what does “success” look like? Then what “response” was necessary to achieve that? Then what provoked that response – was it the person’s mindset? Their perspective? Or was it a combination of the two?

    (Oh, and just so you know, I *am* wearing my toga as I write this!)

    1. Thanks Ian for the comment. I really link the idea of ‘success’. I wonder what success looks like on Twitter or any similar platform?

Mentions

  • DigiUnite
  • DigiUnite

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *