Who’s Telling Your Story – An Introduction to Storify


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One of the biggest challenges in regards to digital literacies is who is telling your story? It can be argued that if we don’t take ownership of your own narrative, then someone will tell it for us. This is what is meant when people ask whether you have Googled yourself. Doug Belshaw talks about being mindful of the way in which tools shape the way we think and interact, I feel that we also need to be mindful of the way in which they tell also tell our stories for us.

One way in which we tell our story is by curating it. Heather Bailie suggests that in regards to digital literacies our focus has moved from the traditional idea of read, write and react, to a focus on being able to create, curate and contemplate. Often we talk about social bookmarking as a means for curating content and ideas. This could include sharing links to a digital magazine, like Flipboard, or adding to an online repository, such as Diigo. However, such collections have their limits. Although they may provide a means for communicating and commenting, they are often best considered as a resource you can mine at a later date. For a more extensive discussion of curation, see Sue Waters post.

A different means of telling your story is through blogging. As a medium, blogging offers so many different possibilities. Maybe you want to reflect upon things. Maybe you have media you want to share, more often than not you can simply embed it. Maybe you don’t like the structure and layout of the platform, then go find another one, there are enough. The reality is the possibilities with blogging are limitless and often only confined by your imagination. For example, a relatively new open sourced platform that I have started exploring is Known. I think that it offers something in-between twitter and long form blogging in my own space.

A medium which is a bit different to traditional blogging, but offering the same creative potential, is Storify. Designed to help make sense of what people post on social media. Not only does it provide the means to curate information from different platforms and places, but it also provides the means to fill in the story. Some of the different curations I have seen include:

Although you can search for content within Storify, the tendency is to use hashtags to collect ideas and information. You can then either share the Storify product or embed it within a blog.

For a short guide to curating a story with Storify, watch the following video:

So what about you, what are the ways that you are telling your story? I would love to know.

 


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Aaron Davis

I am an Australian educator supporting schools with the integration of technology and pedagogical innovation. I have an interest in how together we can work to make a better world.

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1 thought on “Who’s Telling Your Story – An Introduction to Storify

  1. Blogging Resources

    6 min read

    A collection of resources assocatied with blogging:Why Blog?<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=134">I Blog Therefore I Am</a>A collectuon of thoughts regards the benefits of blogging.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=537">Blogging Starts with Why</a>There is so much written about why to blog, this post starts with finding your reason.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=2433">Developing a Blog</a>Often blogs are spoken about as some sort of fixed entity. Sadly, this focuses on the what overlooks how and why we blog in the first place.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1710">Why Blogging Still Matters</a>With the rise of various social media spaces in education, such as Facebook and Google+, blogs matter more than ever for they offer control and privacy that other spaces do not provide.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=2364">The Many Faces of Blogging</a>Some break blogging down into tasks or unpacking the response. However, we often overlook the purpose and intent behind them.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=568">5 Ways to Change the World Yesterday</a>Why associated with blogging starts with me, but it is through sharing that ideas and thinking are given the possibility to grown and develop,<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1102">Blogging in the Classroom</a>A reflection on my experiences of blogging in the classroom.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=686">There is More Than One Way to Write a Blog</a> Often it is presumed that there is only one way to write a blog, this post unpacks some other possibilities, including as a means of collecting links and resources. <a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=78">Sharing the Load of Blogging In and Out of the Classroom</a>Exploring the different possibilities and potentials of collaborative blogging beyond the classroom. <a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=133">Sharing the Load of Blogging</a> A reflection on the idea of a collaborative school blog to share practice. Which Platform?<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=2325">A Guide to Blogging Platforms and their Niches</a>A summary of some of the different blogging services available, what they enable and where their biases lie. Included are an array of resources to support.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1286">Creating a Deliberate Social Media Space for Students in School</a>To support students in regards to digital citizenship, use WordPress to create a social space, therefore gaining more control over online presence<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1134">Starting with Edublogs from Scratch</a>I have discussed the benefits of blogging with Global2, as well as some of the intricacies, however, I have not unpacked how to get started.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=794">Introduction to Blogging with Global2</a>Some of the possibilities for blogging with Global2/Edublogs, as well as a list of resources to with getting going.How To Engage?<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=598">To Comment or Not To Comment? Is that the Question</a>There are many out there who say blogging is dead and that this is best epitomised in lack of dialogue and conversation. This post provides a different perspective by reframing the question.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1959">What Makes a Comment?</a>A question that does not get asked often enough is what it actually means to comment and what might it mean to bring the comment back?<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1763">Reading Texts is Easy, especially When You Listen to Them</a>Although not directly on blogging, it captures some different ways to listen to blogs, rather than read them.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1052">Ten Step Guide to Being Connected</a>An attempt at a guide to getting connected. Having a blog as a place for people to hear your story is an essential part of it.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=834">A Guide to Following Blogs</a>A post that explains some different ways to follow a blog, including subscribing, via an RSS Reader or an automated recipe using a platform like IFTTT.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=76">Are You Really Connected If You Are Not Giving Back</a>One of the challenges with a participatory environment is that without contributions there is no network. So it begs the question, are you really connected if you are not giving back?Reflection<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=68">Read, Write, Respond</a>A reflection on the decisions associated with beginning a blog.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=2337">A Blog for All Seasons</a>Different blogging platforms enable different possibilities. Here is an account of some examples that I have created over time.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=444">Uncanny Reflections on a Year Blogging</a>Memories forgotten can often haunt us when later uncovered. This post is about three posts that had this effect.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1322">Reflecting on the Voices in the Village</a>Rather than look back at the number of hits to measure the impact, here is a collection of comments from readers collected across the year. Creating Content<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1122">Creating Images for Blogs</a>A list of programs with their positives and negatives for making visual quotes to add to blogs and other social media platforms.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1069">Who’s Telling Your Story</a> An introduction to Storify, a platform that allows you to curate tge content a number of social media platforms and then embed it within a blog.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1255">Powering Up Your Blog by Adding Content</a>Incorporate different content, such as video, GIFs and audio, in order to improve engagement and communicate using a different voice.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1203">A Guide to Visualisations</a>There are so many different forms of visuals that you can add to a blog, from a mind map to a sketchnote, each adding to the mental image of the reader.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1266">Making My Own Maps with Google Apps</a>Another point of contact to embed in a blog.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=971">An Introduction to GIFs</a>A guide to creating and sharing GIFs. Reviews<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=2348">Claim Your Domain</a>A review of Audrey Watters book on why it is important to claim our presence online and some steps to going about it.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1885">School of Thought</a>A review of Dan Haesler 's book. Although not solely about blogging, he touches on it throughout.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=850">Master Teacher to Master Learner</a>A review of Will Richardson's book unpacking connected learning. Blogging is an important part of this. <a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=12">Things Are Not Always As They Seem</a>A collection of short reviews, including a comment on Clive Thompson's Smarter Than You Think and David Weinberger’s To Big to Know<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=1153">(Re)Claiming My Space on the Web</a>A reflection on my experience of blogging with Reclaim Hosting so far.<a href="http://readwriterespond.com/?p=416">Looking for a Local Perspective on Blogging</a>In response to AITSL’s dismal attempt to provide a list of bloggers for educators to read, this is my attempt to capture a local perspective. Other Resources<a href="https://www.diigo.com/user/aarondavis/blogging">Diigo Library</a> Blogs to <a href="https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1u8rMEt-jocpL3qZTqFa25AF9Ak67XfOApNFOS7KBC18/edit?usp=sharing">Follow</a> &amp; <a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7zjf-LFJlqWS3pqanhlOVk2NEE/view?usp=sharing">OPML for Feedly</a>

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